Category Archives: Women’s Health

Sexual Health, Function, and Identity after Cancer

Upon hearing a cancer diagnosis a person’s world changes immediately and forever. The person becomes a patient. The patient has to make myriad decisions about treatment plans, and the possibility of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. These treatments, while life-saving, are also life-altering. The side effects can modify body image, reduce

Fuel your Fire for Desire with Fiera

A new sexual wellness device is revolutionizing sexual health care.  It’s not a vibrator exactly (but it does vibrate). A vibrator stimulates the clitoris directly or indirectly through vibration and pulses (that’s why it’s called a vibrator). Fiera is different. Fiera is a self-adhering clitoral vacuum that increases blood flow

Surgery for Uterine Fibroids? Get a Second Opinion

Uterine fibroids (UF) are very common in women of reproductive age, affecting approximately 70% and 80% in white and black women, respectively, across the lifecycle. If you have been diagnosed with uterine fibroids and the doctor recommends surgery, you should know there are non-surgical methods to treat this condition. Before

The Longevity of the “Afterglow”

The postcoital feeling of deep connection, known as the “afterglow” is something couples can rely on to continue for a long time after the actual sexual encounter, according to a new report. The title, “Quantifying the Afterglow” published in Psychological Science, may sound like scientists are breaking it down beyond

Survival Skills for Today’s Gynecologist 2017

If you’re in the New York City area on April 7-9, 2017 join me and colleagues at the The Westin NY at Times Square for our annual Survival Skills for Today’s Gynecologist program. It’s a great time to catch up with friends and hear discussions about the latest in gynecologic

Good News about Teen Pregnancy Rates: They’re Down

The encouraging news that teen pregnancy rates have been on the decline comes to us from the Journal of Adolescent Health. The amount of medically accurate information available for teens has increased. The conversation about what constitutes safe sex as well as the fact that some teens are simply waiting